Today’s The Day – Half a Billion Dollars, 16 Years in The Making

They say dreams are born during childhood and suffocate during adulthood.

It was July 20, 1985, at 1:05 pm, the marine radio crackled to life in Mel Fisher’s Florida Keys office, “Unit 1, this is Unit 11. Put away the chart’s, we’ve got the Mother Lode!”

Sunken treasure. Pirate gold. Long John Silver. Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest — Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum! Mel Fisher was a treasure hunter. Inspired after having read Robert Louis Stevenson‘s Treasure Island as a boy, his heart was eventually set on the search of the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de Atocha – a royal galleon with 40 tons of gold and silver aboard which sank in a devastating hurricane in 1622 and was never found.

For 16 years, Mel Fisher searched the sea bed for the lost galleon. In the process, he lost a son and daughter-in-law, when the boat they were on capsized in 1975.

This man went out on search every single day for 16 years. Can you imagine coming home to your wife each day, who asks you, did you find anything today dear? To which you reply, not today honey. For 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, every day, for 16 years! Can you imagine if he stopped searching after 12 months, 18 months, or 2 years!?

Why didn’t Mel stop searching? I mean, so many people set goals but never quite achieve them. Setting goals are easy. Just think back to how many time you set yourself new goals each new year’s day? How long did it last? Maybe your goal wasn’t compelling or inspiring enough? Maybe the goal you set for yourself wasn’t even exciting enough for you?

What made Mel chase his goal for 16 years without any bit of evidence he was anywhere near achieving it along the way? It’s that leap out of bed in the morning feeling. It’s when you don’t think about work as being work. Anyone that’s working towards something knows what I’m talking about. The vision, the excitement, the growth, absolutely loving the journey.

Do you think Mel Fisher would have given up on his dream if he didn’t find the Atocha after 16 years? What about after 17 years? 18 years? I’m a massive believer in purpose – why do you want what you want? What will it bring you? Once you know why you’re doing what you’re doing, you’ll always find ways to make it happen. Reasons come first, the answers follow.

The Atocha was added to the Guinness Book of World Records for being the most valuable shipwreck to be recovered (estimated at $400,000,000). Mel Fisher’s mantra each and every day during the years-long search for the Atocha, “Today’s the day.”