A Bear Market is Just Around The Corner (or is it?)

You’d be totally forgiven for thinking no more of what a bad economy and market looks and feels like. I mean, how could you not?

Consumer confidence is the highest it’s been for a number of years, and well ahead of GFC lows:

Australia Consumer Confidence

We’re spending more:

Australia Consumer Spending

We’re saving less:

Australia Household Saving Ratio

We’re earning more money since the GFC:

Australia Average Weekly Wages

And of course, the stock market…say no more:

World stock markets continue to make all time highs. The current bull market (as defined as a 20%+ increase in the market) has lasted 3,255 days, which in fact is the second longest on record behind the 4,494 day bull market that ran from late 1987 through to the early 2000. The market climbed 13 years without a single decline of 20% or more.

If this bull market was going to topple the record of the 1987 bull market, we’d see our stock market continue to climb until the 19th of June 2021. Hard to imagine right? It’s not as if it hasn’t happened before!

Here’s a chart of both bull and bear markets since 1926. It shows the number of days both bull and bear markets have lasted. A couple of things to note: 1) Bull markets last longer than bear markets (I mean, a lot longer!) – the average bull market has lasted 981 days, and the average bear market has lasted 296 days, and 2) Bull/bear market cycles have been lasting longer since WW2.

Source: BIG

Let’s dig a little deeper into the post WW2 period. The chart below shows all the bull (in green) and bear (in red) markets, when they started, ended, the percentage change, and number of days they lasted. The average bull market was up 152.4% and lasted 1,651 days, with the average bear market falling 31.8% and lasting 362 days.

Source: BIG

Meanwhile, pundits have been calling for the mark top since 2012. I want you to read these comments, seriously, read them. And next time you hear or see another attention grabbing headline about the market, I want you to recall this post.┬áHere’s a summary of the commentary since (click for larger image):

Market All Time Highs (ATH) doesn’t necessarily mean the market will crash. Here are the number of ATHs each year since 1929. The year 1995 set the record with 77 ATHs, 1964 recording 65, and 2017 notching up 62. The year 2017 is sitting in third place with the number of ATHs in any given year. Presently, the year 2018 is in 27th place, with four months to go in the year – anything could happen.

No one knows how long this market will continue to run hot. No one knows when the market will collapse either.

What you can and should do however, is design your portfolio as if the market will collapse tomorrow. Because someday, maybe sooner rather than later, the market will collapse tomorrow. And you will exhibit precisely the same behaviour as you did in 2008. You will have forgotten how you behaved, however you will remember exactly how it felt. Your human mind will switch to ‘fight-or-flight’ mode, and you will either destroy a lifetime of savings, or you could create a lifetime of savings – the choice is yours.

As long as the music keeps playing, we’ll all continue to dance, until it stops.